We need your help to give vital breaks to unpaid carers across Wiltshire!

Most of us have found the current coronavirus situation hard, having to isolate ourselves from family and friends. But for unpaid carers, this can be their normal, and may carry on for much longer after things go back to normal for the rest of us.

Carers UK shockingly found that 40% of carers haven’t taken a day off their caring role in over a year.

We strive to create carer-friendly communities in Wiltshire in which carers are valued, recognised and acknowledged for the incredible work that they do.

Our Time for Carers Appeal removes financial barriers so that unpaid carers can have the same opportunities as their peers to do the things they enjoy so they are happier, less anxious and more supported.

MAKE YOUR DONATION TODAY

Get creative with fundraising!

Since lockdown, many of us have experienced feelings of loneliness or isolation. But for unpaid carers across Wiltshire, these feelings are very much the norm. Carers are often under ‘virtual lockdown’ for years as they prioritise the care for their loved one before the needs of their own. 

The Time for Carers Appeal removes any financial barriers and provides equal opportunities for carers from all backgrounds to get the breaks they need; whether that’s going swimming, taking the kids to a football match or going to an art class with friends.

Make a one-off or regular donation to our Time for Carers Appeal and help us fund much needed breaks for unpaid carers to do the things they enjoy so they can recharge and not hit breaking point.

Give unpaid carers the gift of time, donate to our Time for Carers Appeal today.

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Did you know….?

  • 10% of Wiltshire’s population are unpaid carers – approximately 47,000 (Census 2011)
  • Approximately 70% of carers are providing more care than before the Covid-19 crisis.
  • Over half of carers (55%) reported feeling overwhelmed and worried they were going to burn-out in the next few weeks (Carers UK; Caring Behind Closed Doors; 2020)
  • 66% of carers reported that one of the biggest challenges they face as a result of their caring role, was no time away from caring – no breaks (Carers Week Report; 2020)
  • 40% of carers haven’t had a break in over a year
  • 25% of carers haven’t had a break in 5 years
  • Nearly 40% of carers say they are ‘struggling to make ends meet’
  • 64% of carers say that they have neglected their own needs to focus on the needs of the person they care for (Carers UK; State of Caring Survey; 2019)

Help us to support the unpaid carers in your local community and make a difference by donating or fundraising for our Time for Carers Appeal.

MAKE YOUR DONATION TODAY

Get creative with fundraising!

Find out about the carers who found hope with the Time for Carers Appeal:

Read Claire’s story.

Watch David’s video.

Get creative raising money for carers.

 

Please do get in touch with our friendly team if you have any questions – fundraising@carersupportwiltshire.co.uk

Claire’s story

In 2018, Claire was left with no carers to help look after her elderly mother who needs 24/7 care.

“The care agency left us in the lurch 5 1/2 weeks before Christmas. I was due to have an eye operation and my brother had been seriously ill. I was at my wit’s end. I was very tearful and crying every day. I felt trapped and isolated and just wanted to run away.”

We arranged for an urgent carers assessment review and crisis meeting. We couldn’t fix the care company situation, but we could offer support and arranged for the funding to give Claire a change of scenery and some time out.

Claire didn’t want to leave her mother, so we were able to pay for the family to go on a five day holiday to the coast in a hotel specially adapted for Claire’s mother.

“We had all been stuck within the same four walls – the holiday gave us opportunity to relax and gave me the time to think about what I was going to do and put things into perspective. I was able to clear my head and get back on track.

“It wasn’t even just about being given the money to get away – it was about being seen and valued as a carer and given the recognition and support that enabled me to carry on.”